Tips for Relieving Foot Pain




Well, I'm back at it again with food pain!!! I must've either overdone it with tennis or maybe I waited too long to get new shoe inserts, or maybe new shoes. Heel and plantar fasciitis pain are something that both extremely painful and can really limit your activities if you don't take care of the problem ASAP!


Definition:

Plantar Fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. It involves pain and inflammation of a thick band of tissue, called the plantar fascia, that runs across the bottom of your foot and connects your heel bone to your toes.


Plantar fasciitis commonly causes stabbing pain that usually occurs with your very first steps in the morning. Once your foot limbers up, the pain of plantar fasciitis normally decreases, but it may return after long periods of standing or after getting up from a seated position.


Plantar fasciitis is particularly common in runners. In addition, people who are overweight and those who wear shoes with inadequate support are at risk of plantar fasciitis.


Symptoms:

Plantar fasciitis typically causes a stabbing pain in the bottom of your foot near the heel. The pain is usually worst with the first few steps after awakening, although it can also be triggered by long periods of standing or getting up from a seated position.


Causes:

Under normal circumstances, your plantar fascia acts like a shock-absorbing bowstring, supporting the arch in your foot. If tension on that bowstring becomes too great, it can create small tears in the fascia. Repetitive stretching and tearing can cause the fascia to become irritated or inflamed.



Lifestyle and Home Remedy:

To reduce the pain of plantar fasciitis, try these self-care tips:

  • Maintain a healthy weight. This minimizes the stress on your plantar fascia.

  • Choose supportive shoes. Avoid high heels. Buy shoes with a low to moderate heel, good arch support and shock absorbency. Don't go barefoot, especially on hard surfaces.

  • Don't wear worn-out athletic shoes. Replace your old athletic shoes before they stop supporting and cushioning your feet. If you're a runner, buy new shoes after about 500 miles of use.

  • Change your sport. Try a low-impact sport, such as swimming or bicycling, instead of walking or jogging.

  • Apply ice. Hold a cloth-covered ice pack over the area of pain for 15 to 20 minutes three or four times a day or after activity. Or try ice massage. Freeze a water-filled paper cup and roll it over the site of discomfort for about five to seven minutes. Regular ice massage can help reduce pain and inflammation.

  • Stretch your arches. Simple home exercises can stretch your plantar fascia, Achilles tendon and calf muscles


Foot stretches to prevent plantar fasciitis:

Hold each stretch for at least 30 seconds — don't bounce — and do one or two repetitions two to three times a day. Left: Stand as shown, with your back leg straight and heel down. Move your hips forward until you feel a stretch in your calf. Switch legs and repeat. Top right: While sitting, grasp your toes and gently pull them toward you until you feel a stretch in the arch of your foot. Stretch one foot at a time. Bottom right: To strengthen arch muscles, place a towel on the floor, grab the towel with your toes and pull it toward you. Repeat with your other foot.


***If symptoms don't go away within 2 weeks, make an appointment with a podiatrist to see if something else is going on too or maybe you'll need physical therapy.